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Briefing paper


 
 


This briefing note presents the findings of seven case studies conducted from May to June 2014. The studies were conducted in Bangladesh, Cambodia, India, Indonesia, Laos, Nepal and Thailand and looked into the livelihood and food security among indigenous shifting cultivation communities in South and Southeast Asia.

The briefing note provides a summary of the main findings of the case studies and the common recommendations from a multi-stakeholders consultation held August 28-29 in Chiang Mai, Thailand. Participants at the multi-stakeholder consultation included government agencies, UN agencies, regional NGOs, Indigenous Peoples’ organisations, community leaders, and local governments.

2014 September 29

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Land grabbing is the large-scale acquisition of land for commercial or industrial purposes, such as agricultural and biofuel production, mining and logging concessions or tourism. It involves land being purchased by investors rather than producers, often foreign investors. This is done with limited (if any) consultation of the local communities, limited (if any) compensation, and a lack of regard for environmental sustainability and equitable access to, or control over, natural resources.

IWGIA - 2014 September 18

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Indigenous peoples constitute 5 % of the world’s population but 15 % of the world’s poor. They make up around 1/3 of the world’s extremely poor rural population. Many lack access to, control over and suffer pollution of their water resources, severely damaging their health, livelihood and cultural survival.

The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) offer a unique opportunity to address these concerns and to take indigenous peoples’ right to water into consideration.

This note, produced by the International Work Group for Indigenous Affairs (IWGIA) in collaboration with Tebtebba and with contributions and advice from indigenous peoples’ experts,1 aims to inform stakeholders about the issue of water from an indigenous perspective in the post 2015-development discussion.

2014 September 18

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The universal Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and the post-2015 development agenda are crucial for indigenous peoples as they will determine the direction of global sustainability and development efforts over the coming decade.

Indigenous peoples make up more than 370 million people worldwide and 15% of the world’s poorest individuals. They represent more than 5,000 distinct ethnic groups and are the guardians of most of the world’s biological and cultural diversity. If the international community is truly committed to a more sustainable future for all, then indigenous peoples must not be ignored the way they were in the Millennium Development Goals.

IWGIA, Tebtebba and International Indian Treaty Council - 2014 September 18

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Many of the areas of highest biological diversity on the planet are inhabited by indigenous peo¬ples. The current and accelerating climatic and environmental changes threaten indigenous peo¬ples’ basis for existence around the world.

The post-2015 development agenda offers a unique opportunity to address indigenous peoples’ key concerns and possible solutions for environmental sustainability beyond 2015.

This briefing note has been prepared by the International Work Group for Indigenous Affairs (IWGIA), in collaboration with Tebtebba, and is intended as an informative note for stakeholders in the post-2015 development process.

IWGIA and Tebtebba - 2014 September 18

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This case study focuses on the capacity of local communities to monitor biodiversity and resources in Madagascar, Nicaragua, Philippines and Tanzania. It makes a controlled comparison between local community monitoring and trained scientists’ monitoring and conclude that local and indigenous communities generate similar and equally good outputs as the trained scientists, and are much more cost efficient. The cases suggest that it is fully possible to build a cheap and effective MRV system based on community monitoring of Non-Carbon Benefits.

IWGIA, AIPP, IBIS, AMAN, Forest of the World, CARE & NEFIN - 2014 June 4

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This case study from Peru illustrates the importance of Non-Carbon Benefits (NCBs) to REDD+, and particularly the effects of land demarcation and titling of indigenous communities, its impact on governance and democracy, on social structures and livelihoods, and on environment and forest cover. The case shows that NCBs are both land tenure rights as well as subsistence and coffee production, illustrating the synergy between rights, carbon and economic benefits for the indigenous population.

IWGIA, AIPP, IBIS, AMAN, Forest of the World, CARE & NEFIN - 2014 June 4

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Recognition of rights to land, territories and natural resources are crucial preconditions for achieving a number of Non-Carbon Benefits for indigenous peoples and local communities and an important incentive for their active participation in REDD+, in all decision-making processes and implementation.

This briefing note provides input to the methodological discussion on Non-Carbon Benefits, as referred to in decisions and discussions under the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change.

IWGIA, AIPP, IBIS, AMAN, Forest of the World, CARE & NEFIN - 2014 June 4

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The post-2015 development framework poses a unique opportunity to address the critical governance issues that are affecting indigenous peoples. This note is intended as a discussion paper for stakeholders in the post-2015 development process and focuses on indigenous peoples’ distinct status and human rights and how these must be taken into consideration in the post-2015 development agenda.

The note has been prepared by the International Work Group for Indigenous Affairs (IWGIA) in collaboration with Tebtebba.

IWGIA and Tebtebba - 2014 May 20

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Indigenous women face a range of problems related to the violation of their rights. This note focuses on the causes and how they can be addressed in the post-2015 development agenda. It has been prepared by the International Work Group for Indigenous Affairs (IWGIA) in collabo¬ration with Tebtebba and is intended as a discussion paper for stakeholders in the post-2015 development process.

IWGIA and Tebtebba - 2014 May 19

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Indigenous peoples lack behind on health. The post-2015 development agenda offers a unique op¬portunity for indigenous peoples to address what they see as key concerns and priorities. The paper is intended as a discussion paper for stakeholders in the post-2015 process and reflects on the current situation of indigenous people and health-related issues and includes a number of recommendations aimed at encouraging a discussion that can feed into the development of the Sustainable Development Goals.

The note has been prepared by the International Work Group for Indigenous Affairs (IWGIA) in collaboration with Tebtebba and with contributions and advice from indigenous peoples and experts.

IWGIA and Tebtebba - 2014 May 19

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Inequality is a defining characteristic of indigenous peoples’ living conditions and permeates all aspects of their lives. The post-2015 development framework and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) offer an opportunity to address and minimize the inequalities faced by indigenous peoples today.

This note has been prepared by the International Work Group for Indigenous Affairs (IWGIA) in collabora¬tion with Tebtebba. It is intended as a discussion paper for stakeholders in the post-2015 development process. It focuses on the causes of and trends in inequality affecting indigenous peoples and suggest the key priority areas to be addressed by the post-2015 development agenda and in the SDGs.

IWGIA and Tebtebba - 2014 May 19

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If indigenous peoples are to enjoy their universal right to education, there are a number of constraints and concerns that need to be addressed. The post-2015 development agenda offers a unique opportunity for indigenous peoples to address what they see as key priorities and the way forward for education beyond 2015.

This briefing note has been prepared by the International Work Group for Indigenous Affairs (IWGIA) in collaboration with Tebtebba and with contributions and advice from indigenous peoples and experts,1 and is intended as a discussion paper for stakeholders in the post-2015 development process.

IWGIA and Tebtebba - 2014 May 19

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Indigenous peoples face severe human rights violations and exploitation of their natural resources due to energy production. The post-2015 development agenda and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) offer a unique opportunity to address unsustainable energy development on indigenous peoples’ lands and territories.

Prepared by the International Work Group for Indigenous Affairs (IWGIA) in collaboration with Tebtebba, this note is intended as a discussion paper for stakeholders in the post-2015 development process. It focuses on indigenous people and energy-related issues and includes recommendations for the post-2015 development process and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

IWGIA and Tebtebba - 2014 May 19

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Por Yaiza Campanario Baqué
El pueblo Caquinte fue considerado, hasta hace muy poco tiempo, un pueblo en contacto inicial y/o esporádico. Perteneciente a la familia lingüística awarak, se encuentra distribuido en tres comunidades y cuatro anexos1 ubicados entre las provincias de Junín y Cusco. Cuenta con una población aproximada de 1.150 habitantes.

Hasta la llegada de las empresas gasíferas a su territorio, sus relaciones se reducían a los avatares con sus vecinos asháninkas y matsiguengas, así como algunos contactos esporádicos con población mestiza durante los desplazamientos de algunos de sus representantes a Satipo o alguna otra de las urbes de la región.

Fruto de las complicaciones surgidas tras el ingreso de las empresas se creó, en 2005, la Organización de Desarrollo del Pueblo Kakinte (ODPK), primera organización representativa de este pueblo con la que hicieron su aparición en el escenario público peruano.

IWGIA - 2014 January

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Por Pedro García Hierro
Una gobernanza exitosa requiere de un orden jurídico y político estable, y eso no es lo que se ofreció a los pueblos indígenas en las primeras décadas del siglo XXI. El texto analiza la situación actual de la gobernanza territorial entre los pueblos indígenas y los cambios legales, económicos, organizativos y culturales que afectan a las comunidades.

IWGIA - 2013 December

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Jorge Agurto

Son varias las razones por las cuales es importante reivindicar el derecho a la comunicación de los pueblos indígenas. Este breve texto abarca cinco dimensiones como forma de contribuir a la reflexión y al debate, tomando como punto de partida los desafíos de la actual agenda indígena en comunicación.

IWGIA - 2013 November 20

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By Kanyinke Sena
Briefing note on how the Maasai have been affected by the Olkaria geothermal field that is placed on their ancestral land in Kenya.

IWGIA - 2013 November

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Parakuiyo Pastoralists Indigenous Community Development Organization (PAICODEO), PINGOs Forum, Tanzania Land Alliance (TALA), the Legal and Human Rights Centre (LHRC) and journalists from ITV, Star TV, Channel 10 and Mwananchi newspaper have conducted a fact finding mission concerning the forced evictions of pastoralists in Kilombero and Ulanga districts in Morogoro region in Tanzania. The fact finding mission was carried out from 12.11 – 15.11 2012.

IWGIA & PAICODEO - 2013 June

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This briefing note, published by the Asia Indigenous Peoples Pact (AIPP) and Forest Peoples Programme, is intended to develop discussion and thought about the complexity of the challenges of violence against indigenous women and girls. Work being done by indigenous women’s organisations in Asia and around the world has increasingly drawn attention to the need for specific analysis and understanding to be established of the nature and forms of such violence.

AIPP & Forest Peoples Programme (FPP) - 2013 May

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This briefing paper is prepared as part of the advocacy of the Asia Indigenous Peoples Pact (AIPP) for the respect, protection and recognition of the human rights of indigenous women. In this paper, the focus is on access to justice for indigenous women in Southeast Asia facing development-induced violence. We draw on the results of the Southeast Asia Regional Consultation on Development, Access to Justice and the Human Rights of Indigenous Women, held on October 30 – November 02, 2012 in Chiang Mai, Thailand that the Asia Indigenous Peoples Pact (AIPP) convened in collaboration with the UN WOMEN Regional Office of Asia and Pacific. Focus of the cases and testimonies were on state and corporate development projects and their impact on the human rights of indigenous women. These projects included dams, mines, plantations, national parks and the like.

AIPP - 2013 March

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This briefing paper draws on Indigenous Peoples’ issues and concerns relating to climate change adaptation. It analyses two cases: the adaptation practices among the Tangkhul Naga Community in the North Eastern Region of India and the traditional adaptation practices of Pidlisan-Kankanaeys of Sagada,Mountain Province and Ikalahan-Kalanguya of Caraballo Mountains,Cagayan Valley of the Philippines.

IWGIA & AIPP - 2012 November

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This briefing paper aims to outline the lessons learn from the Cancun Agreement and explores how far the REDD+ countries in Asia have advanced in addressing social and environmental issues in their REDD+ strategy drafting. From asking which experiences indigenous peoples have made so far in engaging with REDD+, the briefing paper reflects on a few piloting initiatives which have been found particularly interesting and inspiring.

IWGIA & AIPP - 2012 November

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From 5-6 November, an indigenous preparatory meeting in Copenhagen discussed Indigenous Peoples’ experiences, challenges and opportunities with regard to business and human rights, as well as the Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights for implementing the UN “Protect, Respect and Remedy” Framework, possible ways of engaging with the UN Working Group on the issue of human rights and transnational corporations and other business enterprises (UNWG) and participation in the first annual UN Forum on Business and Human Rights.

This briefing note summarises the outcomes of the meeting and provides an overview of the challenges and opportunities identified, as well as concrete recommendations to the UNWG.

IWGIA, Batani & Forum for ursprungsspørgsmål i bistanden - 2012 November

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Briefing note on the consequences of coal mining on the livelihood of the Shorts and the Teleuts, two of Russia’s small numbered indigenous people in West Siberia.

IWGIA & Raipon - 2012 September

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Briefing note about the environmental consequences of mineral mining on the indigenous Evenkis, Nenets, Dolgans, Nganasans and Ents of the Russian Taimyr Peninsula.

IWGIA & Raipon - 2012 September

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In this briefing paper prepared by AIPP’s Indigenous Women’s Programme in relation to the Rio +20 World Conference on Sustainable Development, indigenous women from the Asia-Pacific region share their key concerns and demands with respect to sustainable development and describe some concrete actions that would improve their role and equal participation in sustainable development initiatives.

AIPP & IWGIA - 2012 June 15

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Submission to the SBSTA on the Drivers of Derforestation including key findings of research on shifting cultivation, underpinning the dire need to earnestly consider indigenous peoples’ perspectives while assessing its impact on forests and climate change, and the human rights violations and other impacts resulting from state policies prohibiting or unduly
restricting shifting cultivation

Asian Indigenous Peoples Pact (AIPP) and IWGIA - 2012 May 14

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The briefing paper analyses how gender relations in Asian indigenous societies have undergone and continue to undergo changes in response to external factors. Finally it draws conclusions and recommendations based on addressing problems through empowering indigenous women in traditional customary institutions.

AIPP - 2012 May

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This newsletter is an outcome of a project implemented by SWEEDO in Kenya and focuses on the tradition of “Girl beading” which entails engagement of very young girls in sexual relationships. The tradition frequently leads to cruel forceful abortions, increases the spread of HIV/AIDS and forces the girls to leave school. In the present newsletter the beading practice is for the first time highlighted and discussed.

SWEEDO and IWGIA - 2012 April

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