• Indigenous peoples in Greenland

    Indigenous peoples in Greenland

    The indigenous peoples of Greenland are Inuit and make up a majority of the Greenlandic population. Greenland is a self-governing country within the Danish Realm, and although Denmark has adopted the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Greenland’s population continue to face challenges.
  • Peoples

    50,000 out of Greenland’s 56,000 peoples are Inuit
  • Rights

    2007: Denmark adopts the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples
  • Children's rights

    2010: The Government of Greenland and UNICEF Denmark enter into a partnership agreement to raise awareness of children's rights in Greenland
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  • Arctic Council: Arctic peoples’ Nuuk press release

Arctic Council: Arctic peoples’ Nuuk press release

At the Arctic Council Ministerial in Nuuk, May 12 2011, the Foreign Ministers of the 8 Arctic states decided to establish a standing secretariat in Tromsoe, Norway. The establishment of a standing secretariat in an integral part of the efforts to strengthen the Arctic Council as set out in the Nuuk Declaration signed by the ministers at their meeting today.

Representatives of Arctic indigenous peoples that hold Permanent Participant status in the Arctic Council sat at the table with the Foreign Ministers. The Permanent Participant delegates expressed their support of the declaration that will guide the incoming Swedish chairman of the Council for the next two years. In their press release issued at the close of the Ministerial meeting, the Permanent Participants stated: The Arctic Council is the forum in the Arctic for addressing environmental issues of high concern for us as Indigenous peoples. Our primary practices take place in the ecosystems that we depend upon, by herding, gathering, fishing and hunting. Without a healthy environment, our culture and livelihoods will be at stake. When it comes to strengthening the Arctic Council, the Permanent Participants give support to the Arctic States to continue negotiating binding agreements, under the auspices of the Arctic Council, such as the Search and Rescue agreement signed by the Arctic Ministers. Rodion Sulyandziga, Chairman of the Indigenous Peoples Secretariat states “As we move into the Swedish Chairmanship, we commit to working on improving health by establishing adaptive measures to protect our traditional food sources and to support and strengthen indigenous languages.”

Tags: Global governance, Climate action

About IWGIA

IWGIA - International Work Group for Indigenous Affairs - is a global human rights organisation dedicated to promoting, protecting and defending indigenous peoples’ rights. Read more.

Indigenous World

IWGIA's global report, the Indigenous World, provides an update of the current situation for indigenous peoples worldwide. The Indigenous World 2019.

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