• Indigenous peoples in Israel

    Indigenous peoples in Israel

    Bedouins are the indigenous people of Israel. Their indigenous status is not officially recognised by the State of Israel and the Bedouins are politically, socially, economically and culturally marginalised from the rest of the Israeli population, especially challenged in terms of forced displacement.
  • Peoples

    150,000 Bedouins live in seven townships and 11 villages that have been “recognized” over the last decade
  • Rights

    2007: Israel was absent in the vote on the UN Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous Peoples
  • Conditions

    75,000 Bedouins live in 35 “unrecognized villages”, which lack basic services and infrastructure
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  • Israel: Bedouins in the Negev suffer new crop destructions

Israel: Bedouins in the Negev suffer new crop destructions

For the past three weeks, the Israeli government (Israel Land Administration) supported by the Green Patrol and police forces have been destroying cereal crops of Bedouins in the Negev. This is carried out by plowing areas where the wheat has sprouted. On Tuesday, 19th February, 2013, the lands of Wadi El Na’am were ploughed under; on Thursday, 21st February, 2013, north and east of Hura, and between Rakhme and Qasr a-Ser were ploughed. It is estimated that this action refers to approximately 5,000 dunums (a dunum = 1000 sq.m).

Tags: Land rights

About IWGIA

IWGIA - International Work Group for Indigenous Affairs - is a global human rights organisation dedicated to promoting, protecting and defending indigenous peoples’ rights. Read more.

Indigenous World

IWGIA's global report, the Indigenous World, provides an update of the current situation for indigenous peoples worldwide. The Indigenous World 2019.

Contact IWGIA

Prinsessegade 29 B, 3rd floor
DK 1422 Copenhagen
Denmark
Phone: (+45) 53 73 28 30
E-mail: iwgia@iwgia.org
CVR: 81294410

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