• Indigenous peoples in Tanzania

    Indigenous peoples in Tanzania

    Tanzania does not recognise the existence of indigenous peoples, even though Tanzania is home to 125-130 different ethnic groups.
    The Akiye, Hadzabe, Barabaig and Maasai have organised themselves and their struggles around the concept and movement of indigenous peoples.
  • Peoples

    125-130 ethnic groups, falling mainly into the four categories of Bantu, Cushite, Nilo-Hamite and San, live in Tanzania.
  • Current state

    2015: New government in Tanzania elected. A few months after indigenous peoples found themselves the victims of government actions.
    2016-17: Evictions of indigenous peoples in Kilosa, Mvomero and Morogoro Vijijini districts.
  • Rights

    There is no specific national policy or legislation on indigenous peoples.
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  • Tanzania: Forced evictions of Maasai people in Loliondo

Tanzania: Forced evictions of Maasai people in Loliondo

According to reliable information received by IWGIA, forced and illegal evictions of Maasai pastoralists and serious human rights violations are happening in Tanzania. These violations take place on registered village land in Loliondo Division of Ngorongoro District, Arusha Region.

Reports indicate that Maasai houses/bomas have been burned down, livestock have been lost, people have been forced to pay fines, and have been harassed and threatened. It is reported that there is lack of water and food and that men, women, children and the elderly have to sleep out with no shelter. Families are being separated, and many people are now suffering from psychological trauma because of the evictions and harassment. The evictions are creating food insecurity and lead to impoverishment.

Maasai houses burnt to the ground

On the 13th and 14th of August 2017, an estimated 185 Maasai bomas (homesteads) were burned down by Serengeti National Park (SENAPA) and Ngorongoro Conservation Area Authority (NCAA) rangers, supported by police from Loliondo. As a result, it is estimated that approximately 6.800 people have been rendered homeless, had most of their property destroyed and been left without any shelter, food or water. The number is still increasing since the violent eviction is still going on. People’s livestock are also unprotected and many have scattered into the surrounding areas.

 

 

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About IWGIA

IWGIA - International Work Group for Indigenous Affairs - is a global human rights organisation dedicated to promoting, protecting and defending indigenous peoples’ rights. Read more.

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